The Most Scenic Spots in Yorkshire

Published: Tuesday 17th Mar 2020

Written by: Louise Burtt

From beautiful moorland valleys to cascading waterfalls, we're capturing the essence of Yorkshire and listing out top most scenic places in Yorkshire. The perfect locations to sit and admire the stunning views and take a stroll in the fresh air.

Aysgarth Falls

Aysgarth Falls

This spectacular triple flight tumbling waterfall is located close to Leyburn and the lovely villages of Carperby and Aysgarth in the Yorkshire Dales. It is a beauty spot that has been on the tourist trail for over three hundred years and presently you will find a tourist information centre here, along with the Coppice Cafe serving locally-sourced produce. The river Ure hurls itself over three massive rocky steps, the Upper, Middle and Lower Falls. Alongside them is Freeholders’ Wood which is an ancient coppiced woodland. This local nature reserve has easy trails laid out for visitors.

The beauty of the Falls has seen people flocking to the village for centuries, with JMW Turner drawing inspiration from them within his sketches, Dorothy and William Wordsworth are said to have visited and the waterfall also featured in the 1991 blockbuster Robin Hood Prince of Thieves.

 

Whitby Pier

Whitby Pier

Whitby's iconic Grade II listed East Pier is the perfect place to take a refreshing stroll and enjoy some delicious takeaway fish & chips whilst gazing out to sea. Plus the newly built footbridge linking the East pier to the extension will let you see this beautiful fishing town from another perspective. Look back at the stunning view of spectacular Whitby Abbey and St Mary's Church perched on the cliff edge overlooking the town.

 

The Hole of Horcum

The Hole of Horcum

The Hole of Horcum is one of the most stunning features in the North York Moors National Park and is the ideal location to immerse yourself in the great outdoors amongst absolutely breathtaking scenery. This 400ft natural hollow spans 3/4 mile across and is surrounded by miles of beautiful moorland and footpaths for walks with the family or your four legged friend. The nearby villages of Lockton and Levisham offer lovely tearooms and traditional pubs with great beer gardens, or why not pack a picnic and make the most of the outdoors whilst soaking up the breathtaking views.

 

Malham Cove

Malham Cove

This spectacular curved limestone amphitheatre is a well known beauty spot in the Yorkshire Dales National Park and can be reached by a mile of track to the 250' rock face. To experience more of the scenery here, make sure you climb the steps to the west of the cove. If you follow the footpath above Sheriff Hill back down to the cove you can take an interesting and alternative route back to the village of Malham and see the remains of ancient iron age settlements. This is a lovely family friendly walk and boasts brilliant views over Malham and beyond.

It is easy to see why this beautiful natural formation has been the inspiration for many works of art and has featured in numerous TV programmes and films including Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows!

 

Ravenscar

Ravenscar

Set in a dramatic clifftop location, between the coastal towns of Scarborough and Whitby, you will find the little village of Ravenscar. Planned by the Victorian's to be developed as the next big tourist resort, it was given the tag 'The Town That Never Was' due to it never being completed. However what remains is a beautiful headland with numerous walks and cycle routes to enjoy. The views over the bay towards the seaside village of Robin Hood's Bay are absolutely spectacular from here and this amazing vantage point was once used by the Romans as a signal station. 

From here you can also descend the steep path down to the beach on the Jurassic Coast, which is a great spot for fossil hunting. You might even spot the colony of seals here, particularly in June and July when the seals come ashore to pup or the grey seals in November.

Also discover the fascinating old Peak Alum Works, which are now a National Trust site and were once a vital part of the UK's fabric dyeing industry. The quarries, shale tips and factory building remains can be found a short walk from the village by following the signs for the Cleveland Way. The remains of the World War II radar stations can also be found along the Cinder Track, the 21 mile former Scarborough to Whitby railway line, which is a great track to walk or cycle along.


Louise Burtt
Louise Burtt

Author


Share

Return to blog article index